Reports

GOVERNMENTS SHOULD BUY INTO PLANTATIONS

GOVERNMENTS SHOULD BUY INTO PLANTATIONS

This report looks at how grower associations in Europe have fostered greater participation of private landholders in the forest industry. Industry should establish a business case for direct government investment in growing trees to establish critical mass in timber resources based on the public good benefits.

ACTIVE FOREST FIRE MANAGEMENT FOR MULTIPLE LANDSCAPE BENEFITS IN THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA

ACTIVE FOREST FIRE MANAGEMENT FOR MULTIPLE LANDSCAPE BENEFITS IN THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA

This report documents a three week study tour of the United States and Canada on the role of active forest management for multiple landscape benefits, most notably for wildfire risk reduction, renewable bioenergy and forest health. This study builds on the earlier Gottstein Fellowship report by Hamilton (2009) into developments in the use of woody biomass for bioenergy in Canada and the western United States, by focusing more directly on the links between fire management and bioenergy.

BURNING AMBITION – TERTIARY EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES FOR BUSHFIRE PROFESSIONALS

BURNING AMBITION – TERTIARY EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES FOR BUSHFIRE PROFESSIONALS

Gottstein Fellow Tina Bell investigated the opportunities available to bushfire professionals for tertiary education in Australia and compared it to what was available in the US and Canada.   With the demise of many of the traditional forest science courses in Australian universities, the lack of tertiary education opportunities in fire behaviour and fire ecology for land management and forest managers has declined.  Recommendations included that there should be a formal review of the depth and breadth of tertiary level education related to fire theory and practice available in Australia should be undertaken and that the need for a “common curriculum” across Australia in tertiary fire courses be examined, and possibly defined, via an collaborative process between industry, government and fire agencies.

Payments for Watershed Services and Other Market-Based Approaches to Forest Management

Payments for Watershed Services and Other Market-Based Approaches to Forest Management

Forests provide a myriad of hydrological services for the benefit of human societies. It is for this reason that, wherever possible, forests are maintained in drinking water catchments. However, usually these services are not paid for and are taken for granted. They tend to be valued only when an infrequent event such as a wildfire or a logging operation threatens to interrupt this steady, free provision of benefits. The aim of this fellowship was to explore examples in the United States of America where ‘watershed services’ are valued and investments made in forest management to improve or maintain these services paid for by downstream water users.

DESIGN OF EX SITU GENE CONSERVATION PLANTATIONS TO MINIMIZE INBREEDING IN RADIATA PINE

Radiata pine has become one of the most important commercial tree species in
the world and is currently the most extensively planted conifer species in Australia and
New Zealand. The radiata pine domestication process of selection and breeding has
occurred almost entirely in regions far removed from its native forests in California and
Mexico. The wood of this species is remarkably versatile and is used for both structural
and appearance-grade wood products, and for pulp. The conservation of radiata pine
germplasm has become an important component of long-term forest management for its
sustained productivity and profitability. Potential gene conservation benefits include
disease and insect damage alleviation, an increase in volume, improved wood stiffness
and extending the current suitable plantation area by breeding for drought tolerance.
Maintaining such resources to serve their intended purpose needs to be made as
efficient and cost effective as possible. This depends on measures of the underlying
genetic diversity of traits of interest.

US CARBON MARKETS AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR AUSTRALIAN FOREST MANAGERS

This report details outcomes of a study tour undertaken within the United States of America (US) during February 2011, that was generously supported by the Gottstein Trust Fellowship Program. Broadly, the aim was to better understand US carbon markets and develop a ‘roadmap’ that could be used by Australian practitioners to better navigate this space.

Eucalypt Plantation Silvicultural Regimes

Eucalypt Plantation Silvicultural Regimes

Through genetic improvement Pinus radiate D. Don, a sometimes windswept tree growing in small areas of the Monterey Bay and Cambria areas of California (USA) has become a highly significant plantation species in southern Australia (New Zealand and Chile). Other members of the pinus genus have followed into areas not suited to P.RADIATA. During the period of P.radiata plantation development in Australia, management of most natural eucalypt overseas countries parallel scenarios were in place with members of the eucalypt genus. However, with natural good form and vigour their initial planting stock was genetically ahead.1990 Jenkin

Eucalypts silvicultural systems: Plantation forestry for bioenergy and solid wood production

Eucalypts silvicultural systems: Plantation forestry for bioenergy and solid wood production

This report summarises the findings of visits to the University of Florida and various
companies in North America as well as plantations, processing facilities and research
laboratories in Paraguay and Argentina. The principal goal of this study was to gain a
better understanding of alternative silviculture regimes, processing methods and wood
quality evaluation procedures that could be applied in the Eucalyptus plantation forest
industry in Australia.

Sustainability and operational aspects of forest biomass harvesting for energy in Scandinavia

Sustainability and operational aspects of forest biomass harvesting for energy in Scandinavia

This report documents a 5 week study tour in Sweden, Finland and Denmark on sustainability
and operational aspects of forest biomass harvesting for energy generation. It describes
partnerships between forest owners and local governments, sustainable criteria for forest
residue harvesting, planning procedures and chain supply recommendations.

Managing forest hydrology research – lessons from Experimental Forests in the USA

Managing forest hydrology research – lessons from Experimental Forests in the USA

I visited HJ Andrews LTER (Oregon), Coyote Creek Catchment Experiment (Oregon), Wind
River Experimental Forest (Washington State), Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory (North
Carolina), and Hubbard Brook Long Term Ecological Research site (New Hampshire) during
June and July 2009. I spent 4 weeks at Oregon State University processing and analysing 10
years of streamflow data from the Warra Long Term Ecological Research Site paired
catchment experiments under the direction of Dr. Julia Jones (Geography department,
Oregon State University). I also attended an Isotopes in Hydrology research workshop which
coincided with my visit to OSU.