Reports

A Review of Forest Restoration Projects in Tasmania

This report describes the research undertaken in a Gottstein Fellowship study of forest restoration projects in Tasmania.  The aim of the study was to review and document the various Tasmanian projects and to gain an understanding of what motivated people to undertake them, and the scale and methods used, with the intent that this may lead to improved co-operation, knowledge and field outcomes. 

 

WOOD A UNIQUE MATERIAL FOR MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS

WOOD A UNIQUE MATERIAL FOR MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS

This report aims to study the suitability of wood species for high quality musical instruments for soloists and other professional musicians. In the Western cultural tradition the musical instruments of the classical symphony orchestra made in wood are: the string instruments, namely the violin family instruments, guitar, harp, and piano, the woodwind instruments – clarinet, oboe and bassoon and the percussion instruments – xylophone and marimba.

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DESIGNING TIMBER CONSTRUCTION FOR MANUFACTURE AND ASSEMBLY

DESIGNING TIMBER CONSTRUCTION FOR MANUFACTURE AND ASSEMBLY

This report describes research undertaken as part of a Gottstein fellowship study concerning the advancement of prefabricated timber construction with a view to improving its presence in the multi-unit residential and commercial building markets. The study aimed to learn lessons from the application of advanced prefabricated timber construction settings in Sweden, Austria,  Switzerland, Germany and Canada.

NON-TRADITIONAL CELLULOSE PRODUCTS: OPPORTUNITIES FOR INNOVATION, DIVERSIFICATION AND DEVELOPMENT

NON-TRADITIONAL CELLULOSE PRODUCTS: OPPORTUNITIES FOR INNOVATION, DIVERSIFICATION AND DEVELOPMENT

The main objective of the study was to provide information and examples of wood fibre technologies that can support decisions within the Australian forest industry to consider a diversification of the manufacturing sector. This transfer of knowledge will help to enable strong growth through innovation, collaboration and industry sector interlinkages.

The Gottstein project involved visits to Australian companies and organisations and those based in Canana, Sweden and Finland.

AN INTERNATIONAL REVIEW OF PESTCIDE USE AND CULTURE: PEST MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES, CHEMICAL REGULATIONS / FOREST MANAGEMENT CERTIFICATION AND IMPACTS FOR TREE SURVIVAL AND YIELD

AN INTERNATIONAL REVIEW OF PESTCIDE USE AND CULTURE: PEST MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES, CHEMICAL REGULATIONS / FOREST MANAGEMENT CERTIFICATION AND IMPACTS FOR TREE SURVIVAL AND YIELD

Pesticide use is an efficient and cost-effective forest management tool in Australian Forestry. Competition for light, space, water and soil nutrients from vegetation can have detrimental effects on tree survival and productivity of plantation tree species.

The demand for timber is increasing resulting in plantation management in Australia becoming more intensive, as managers try to extract greater volume and value out of each hectare.

The aim of this study tour was to review pesticide use and culture in north-eastern Australia, New Zealand, and south-eastern America by talking to key forestry representatives directly involved in pesticide use, managing and monitoring compliance, and to see the impacts reduced pesticide use or reduced availability of chemicals has on plantation forest management.

IMPROVING QUALITY AND SCOPE OF FOREST FORECASTING IN AUSTRALIA

IMPROVING QUALITY AND SCOPE OF FOREST FORECASTING IN AUSTRALIA

A report on a Gottstein fellowship mission to the US with the objective of ‘Improving the scope and quality of forestry forecasting work in Australia’. Mihir Gupta worked with colleagues from Forest Economic Advisors (FEA) in Boston and the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) in Olympia, Washington State.)

NON-TRADITIONAL CELLULOSE PRODUCTS: OPPORTUNITIES FOR DIVERSIFICATION

NON-TRADITIONAL CELLULOSE PRODUCTS: OPPORTUNITIES FOR DIVERSIFICATION

This study was driven by the recent nanotechnology movement within the forest industries globally and considerations from leaders of the Australian forestry and wood manufacturing industry, reinforcing the need for a closer knowledge on this subject.
Insights obtained directly from the key developers of nanocellulose (NCC) products could maximise decision-making opportunities for innovation, diversification and development.

Dr Mihai Daian at NCC Concentration Unit CelluForce in Canada

Dr Mihai Daian at NCC Concentration Unit CelluForce in Canada

GOVERNMENTS SHOULD BUY INTO PLANTATIONS

GOVERNMENTS SHOULD BUY INTO PLANTATIONS

This report looks at how grower associations in Europe have fostered greater participation of private landholders in the forest industry. Industry should establish a business case for direct government investment in growing trees to establish critical mass in timber resources based on the public good benefits.

ACTIVE FOREST FIRE MANAGEMENT FOR MULTIPLE LANDSCAPE BENEFITS IN THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA

ACTIVE FOREST FIRE MANAGEMENT FOR MULTIPLE LANDSCAPE BENEFITS IN THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA

This report documents a three week study tour of the United States and Canada on the role of active forest management for multiple landscape benefits, most notably for wildfire risk reduction, renewable bioenergy and forest health. This study builds on the earlier Gottstein Fellowship report by Hamilton (2009) into developments in the use of woody biomass for bioenergy in Canada and the western United States, by focusing more directly on the links between fire management and bioenergy.

BURNING AMBITION – TERTIARY EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES FOR BUSHFIRE PROFESSIONALS

BURNING AMBITION – TERTIARY EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES FOR BUSHFIRE PROFESSIONALS

Gottstein Fellow Tina Bell investigated the opportunities available to bushfire professionals for tertiary education in Australia and compared it to what was available in the US and Canada.   With the demise of many of the traditional forest science courses in Australian universities, the lack of tertiary education opportunities in fire behaviour and fire ecology for land management and forest managers has declined.  Recommendations included that there should be a formal review of the depth and breadth of tertiary level education related to fire theory and practice available in Australia should be undertaken and that the need for a “common curriculum” across Australia in tertiary fire courses be examined, and possibly defined, via an collaborative process between industry, government and fire agencies.