Report Year Archives: 2006

Hardwood fibre requirements of the Indian pulp and paper industry

Hardwood fibre requirements of the Indian pulp and paper industry

In 2006, the Gottstein Trustees commissioned a market review to investigate the Indian
wood based pulp and paper industry. The field component of this visit encompassed a
review of mills, infrastructure and potential resource supply opportunities for Australian
growers and exporters. This report summarises the findings of this Fellowship including
current market conditions regarding supply and consumption of hardwood fibre for pulp
and paper manufacturing. The types of opportunities available from Australia are
considered in reference to current and projected available supply and demand scenarios.

Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) as a novel wood quality evaluation tool

Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) as a novel wood quality evaluation tool

This report describes progress towards developing an optimised and validated laserinduced
breakdown spectroscopy system for rapid, accurate and simultaneous inorganic
elemental analysis of wood. Species-specific calibrations were developed for tree species
relevant to the Australasian forest products industry (data currently confidential to
ORNL). Further calibrations will elucidate contaminated timber (arsenic) in the wood
waste stream diverted from landfill. Proof of concept work will demonstrate the
innovative capacity of this technique to address wood quality impacts on wood suitability
for engineered wood products.

Temperate native forests in Chile: management, conservation and forest practices

Temperate native forests in Chile: management, conservation and forest practices

This report discusses management, conservation and forest practices in Chile’s temperate
forests, and relates these to the situation in Tasmania’s forests. Temperate forests in both
places share a flora of Gondwanan origin and have many ecological attributes in common.
There are also similar threads in their management and conservation, both of which have
attracted a great deal of attention. Native forests are used for production of wood and other
products, and are also important for the protection of soil and water values and biodiversity.

Key elements for the successful integration of in-forest optimisation into Australia

Key elements for the successful integration of in-forest optimisation into Australia

Finland has a land area of thirty million hectares. Of this, twenty million hectares is forested –
sixty six percent of the land area. There are 170 industrial scale (>10,000 m3 annually) sawmills,
with a combined sawn output of 13.7 million cubic metres. In addition, Finland produces around
11 million metric tonnes of wood pulp. The 10,000,000 hectares of productive forest is held by
350,000 separate owners, giving an average holding size of about around thirty hectares. The
result of the non-integrated forest ownership is that to source, manage and administer the
resources needed to meet these massive industrial demands requires simple-to-use but
comprehensive, planning, inventory, stock control and reporting systems.

Application of airborne LiDAR in forestry in North America and Scandinavia

Application of airborne LiDAR in forestry in North America and Scandinavia

Airborne laser scanning, also known as airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging),
is a remote sensing technology with a proven track record in 3D land surface
surveying. The laser’s ability to penetrate dense forest cover offers a significant
advantage compared to photogrammetric techniques when mapping the topography of
forested terrain. Research over the past 20 years has shown that LiDAR data carries
information about the horizontal and vertical structure of forests. Methods have been
developed to extract this information and practical applications are starting to find their
way into the forest industry.