Report Year Archives: 2005

Technology for delivering high quality graded softwood product – practical applications

Technology for delivering high quality graded softwood product – practical applications

The grading process employed for the production of most of Australia’s structural
pine products is based on mechanical stress grader designs that are at least 30
years old, and it demands visual grading to underpin grade decisions. The
production speeds, reliability and data handling capabilities of mechanical stress
graders have of course progressed significantly over this time, but it is the
author’s opinion that there are now alternative technologies that can deliver a
more effective grading regime overall.

Computer-controlled optimisation in cut-to-length harvesting systems and associated data flows

Computer-controlled optimisation in cut-to-length harvesting systems and associated data flows

Machine optimisation and data collection is a routine part of Scandinavian harvesting without
which much of the planning and efficiency could not be achieved. The process of placing
values on logs is the method used to ensure that the processing facilities receive the range of
lengths and diameters that they require to fill orders from their sales section. These values are
determined by the processing facility and passed on to the harvesting section, along with
requested amounts, where they are put into a cutting instruction, simulated to determine the
planned outcome and then passed onto the contractor to cut the forest. The actual result is
sent back to the harvesting section so that any adjustments can be made and arrangements
made to transport the logs to the processor that placed the order.

Forest estate modelling of multiple-use forest management

Forest estate modelling of multiple-use forest management

Forest estate modelling is the generic term used to describe the process by which
forest resource planning specialists address the characteristic s of their forest of
interest at the macro-scale. Forest estate models can take many forms, from the very
simplistic woodflow, to the most complex non-wood values. In this way, forest estate
modelling can represent multiple-use forest management.