Diverse benefits for wood in J.W.Gottstein selections

Georgios Anagnostou … closer connection between wood engineering and structural and architectural design.

Georgios Anagnostou … closer connection between wood engineering and structural and architectural design.

CLOSER integration of architectural design and engineering wood construction is a driving theme of a study mission to Japan by Sydney architect Georgios Anagnostou, one of three successful applicants for a 2017 Gottstein Trust fellowship.
A senior associate with Jackson Teece, Mr Anagnostou says the increased use and application of timber engineering technologies and products demands that designers and architects understand the potential and limitation of such technologies.
“Japan has a long history of timber architecture and construction rooted in traditional carpentry and joinery,” he said.
“This profound understanding of designing with timber has influenced architects worldwide until this day.”
Gottstein Trust fellowships were also awarded to Bill Leggate, principal forest products research scientist at the Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries’ Salisbry research facility, and Michael Schofield, forest certification coordinator at the Boyer, Tas, mill of Norske Skog, a world-leading producer of newsprint and magazine paper.
Georgios Anagnostou’s study will especially focus on frame design (traditional, grid- and reciprocal frames/shells) and joints and the potential for integration in proprietary systems, fabrication and related products.
He is currently involved with the design and construction of a significant timber/CLT project and intends to further promote the use of timber construction for future projects.
Mr Anagnostou is actively involved in the timber design industry (architecture and engineering). The Gottstein project will give him the opportunity to contribute to this sector and help create a closer connection between craft/trade, engineering and structural and architectural design.

Bill Legatte … building confidence for building professionals and end-consumers.

Bill Legatte … building confidence for building professionals and end-consumers.

The Gottstein educational grant will assist Bill Leggate in further research into long-term durability, reliability and service life of engineered wood products in Europe and North America.
The proposed project is directly relevant to Mr Leggate’s current PhD and work activities in the field of wood durability, treatment, modification and engineered wood product manufacture and performance.
He is also the nominated leader of any potential DAF Salisbury involvement in the FWPA proposed National Centre for Excellence for Timber Design and Durability.
Mr Leggate said existing long-term durability performance knowledge of EWPs such as CLT, massive timber panels, parallel strand lumber, oriented strand board, laminated veneer lumber and I-beams was predominantly based on experiences in regions such as Europe and North America.
“The Australian timber industry has relatively less experience in this field,” he said.
“However, the significant increase in the use of EWPs in building systems, especially commercial and multi-residential structures in Australia, elevates the importance of ensuring that these building components perform over the long-term and meet service life expectations.”
Mr Leggate said this research was essential in providing confidence for building professionals and end-consumers to choose and accept timber construction solutions compared to other non-wood options.
“Ultimately, the benefit will be increased market share for Australian manufactured wood products and the associated many environmental advantages of using renewable wood products in the built environment,” he said.
“Poor durability performance of wood products is estimated to cost the Australian economy at least $2 billion a year. This is mainly a result of wooden components and structures failing in service due to termites and decay and includes the costs of repairs, replacement and treatment.
“Worldwide this cost has been quoted to be as high as $22 billion a year from termite damage alone.”

Michael Schofield … restoration forestry projects in Tasmania.

Michael Schofield … restoration forestry projects in Tasmania.

The Gottstein study by Michael Schofield will be centered in Tasmania and will involve a review of restoration forestry projects in the state.
Mr Schofield has a Bachelor of Science (forestry) and has a post-graduate certificate in wildlife management. His work has contributed to forest industry training courses, including fire training, pesticide application and natural and cultural heritage training.
He is responsible for maintaining Australian Forest Standard and Forest Stewardship Council certification at Norske Skog and also forest planning and operations.
Situated in southern Tasmania, the Norske Skog mill produced Australia’s first newsprint in 1941 and remains one of the state’s major employers. Annual production is around 290 000 tonnes of newsprint, improved newsprint, book grades and lightweight coated grades since the completion of the $85 million M2 conversion project in 2014.